Iliad summary

Helen watches the fight with King Priam from the walls of Troy, and points out the chief leaders of the opposing forces. Finally, the Achaians rescue Patroklos' corpse, and Hektor captures Achilles' armor.

As a test, Agamemnon calls another assembly and suggests instead that the whole army pull up its tents and sail back home. Distraught at the death of his companion, Achilles then reconciles with Agamemnon and rejoins the fray, despite knowing his deadly fate, and drives all the Trojans before him in his fury.

Zeus agrees to assist the Trojans in their attack on the Achaians, thus showing Agamemnon that Achilleus is a great man, who would be necessary to succeed in battle. Finally, Achilles confronts Hector outside the walls of Troy. Agamemnon seizes the woman. The Achaians are about to be annihilated.

With the help of Athena, Achilles kills Hector. These events include how the warriors are gathered for battle, the cause of the war, and the prophetical events that will affect the life of Achilles.

Hektor, however, refuses to go inside, promising to encounter Achilleus directly instead. At present, the Achaian troops are dying from a mysterious plague. The poem ends with the funeral of Hektor—though we know that soon Achilleus will die and Troy will be captured.

The fighting resumes, and so many Achaians are slaughtered that Agamemnon suggests that his troops sail for home, but finally he is convinced that he must return to the fighting. They advance all the way up to the boundary of the Achaean camp and set fire to one of the ships. All the goddesses present claimed it for themselves, but the choice came down to three—Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera.

At last, the gods agree that Hector deserves a proper burial. In addition, the Trojans will so fear the wrath of the mighty Achilles that they will be easily defeated. When Agamemnon refuses, the priest prays to the god Apollo to send a plague against the Achaians.

Summary of Plot

Under immense pressure, the elderly Achaean captain Nestor proposes that an embassy be sent to Achilles in order to convince him to return to battle.

He also asks his mother, the goddess Thetis, to plead with Zeus to help him avenge the wrong. Paris, a son of the king of Troy, kidnaps Helen, who becomes the legendary "Helen of Troy" and "the woman with the face that launched a thousand ships.

The same cannot be said for the Achaian army. He sends Patroklos into the fighting, disguised as Achilles himself. He and his forces retreat to the beach beside their ships, and Achilles asks his mother, the goddess Thetis, if she will ask Zeus, king of the gods, to help the Trojans defeat his former comrades, the Achaians.

Summary of Plot

Achilleus then holds funeral games for Patroklos, giving many great prizes to the victors. This was a serious breach of the laws of hospitality, which held that guests and hosts owed very specific obligations to each other.

He and his forces retreat to the beach beside their ships, and Achilles asks his mother, the goddess Thetis, if she will ask Zeus, king of the gods, to help the Trojans defeat his former comrades, the Achaians. Thus, he returns to battle in his new armor and is so successful that he and the Achaians rout the Trojans.

First, the priest Chryses comes to ask their leader, King Agamemnon, to release his daughter, whom Agamemnon was holding captive. Achilles is filled with overwhelming grief and rage when he learns that his warrior-companion, Patroklos, has been slaughtered.

In the tenth year of the Trojan War, tensions are running high among the Achaians (a super-ancient name for the Ancient Greeks). First, the priest Chryses comes to ask their leader, King Agamemnon, to release his daughter, whom Agamemnon was holding captive. “The Iliad” (Gr: “Iliás”) is an epic poem by the ancient Greek poet Homer, which recounts some of the significant events of the final weeks of the Trojan War and the Greek siege of the city of Troy (which was also known as Ilion, Ilios or Ilium in ancient times).

The Achaians, under King Agamemnon, have been fighting the Trojans off and on for nine years, trying to retrieve Helen, the wife of Menelaos, and thus Agamemnon's sister-in-law.

Paris, a son of the king of Troy, kidnaps Helen, who becomes the legendary "Helen of Troy" and "the woman with the face. Summary of Plot. A highly condensed summary: The Iliad is set three millennia ago, during the final year of the Trojan War, a conflict in which Greek warriors sailed the Aegean to what is now Turkey and besieged the citadel of Troy for ten years.

The Iliad SparkNotes Literature Guide and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a Reviews: 2.

Iliad Summary Buy Study Guide In the tenth and final year of the Trojan War, Chryses, a priest of Apollo, attempts to ransom his daughter from Agamemnon, commander-in-chief of the Achaeans, who has taken her captive while on a raid.

Iliad summary
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The Iliad - Homer - Ancient Greece - Classical Literature